PYC Arts and Technology HS SIP 2016-2017

School Information

School Number:            357
Grade Span:                  9th Grade – 12th Grade
Principal:                       John Peterson
Phone:                           (612)643-2000
Fax:                               (612) 643-2079
Address:                         2210 Oliver Ave N, Minneapolis, MN 55411
Email:                            jpeterson@pcyc-mpls.org

Schoolwide Instructional Leadership Team

John Peterson                Director of Education
Sarah Wehrenberg         Dean of Instruction

20% Set-Aside

Alignment to Data
Student learning and achievement

Resources or Staff
Additional FTE

Description of Interventions Strategies and Support
A 1.0 tutor coordinator and intervention specialist will coordinate and provide academic interventions for struggling learners, as identified through the RTI process. A 1.0 math specialist will work with math teachers to create learning groups and teaching methods that assist students in recovering gaps in skills.

Resources or Staff Description
We will fund a 1.0 tutor coordinator/intervention specialist and a 1.0 math specialist.

Funds
$12114

Use of Funds
Staff

Identified Student Groups
Free/Reduced Price Lunch

Data Review Notes

DAP Survey

PYC has students take fall and spring DAP surveys to measure students’ socioemotional well-being. Socioemotional skills are an important part of a child’s development and gaps in these skills can often a limit a child’s academic success. Students at PYC historically have higher ACE scores and lower protective factors than their peers in neighboring schools or cities. Because of this, PYC is dedicating more resources to becoming a stress-responsive school that integrates pscyhosocial wellness efforts into all areas of our programming. An important part of this is measuring how effective our stress-responsive practices are at making gains in our student population.

Attendance

The biggest data points looked at for attendance are monthly average attendance rates, and individual student attendance percentages through CFS. The monthly attendance averages are compiled and then compared to years past. The individual attendance rates are monitored by RTI teams who also pick up on trends in attendance among student groups and devise action plans to intervene.

MAP

Leadership at PYC is concerned about the validity of academic testing data. We have found that results on the MAP test vary for a number of reasons: emotional state, hunger, amount of sleep, motivation to do well on that particular test, test fatigue, etc. Students who have a high ACE score and low protective factors struggle more with the spring testing calendar because of the vulnerabilities of their self-concept to these tests. Our data may be reflective of downward academic trends, or it may be reflective of an increase in mandatory school-wide assessments that in its essence can be a damaging experience for our young people.

Comprehensive Needs Assessment

Standards-Based Literacy Instruction CNA

Successes
Teachers continue to grow in their understanding of how to teach literacy across all content areas. There has been an increase in the number of reading assignments given. ELA teachers have created more culturally responsive units and in turn are seeing higher levels of engagement in class. Engagement in SSR has increased.

Prioritized Concerns
Low attendance negatively impacts students’ access to quality instruction and reading materials. Students are selecting more of their own texts, which limits their exposure to various styles of writing. Project base learning can limit students’ exposure to others thinking because there is not as much natural dialogue on texts.

Hypothesized Root Causes (Controllable)
There is concern that students are not as engaged in our curriculum as they could be because it is does not speak to their personal interested or narratives in this world. Teachers are putting forth a concerted effort to design curriculum that is culturally responsive and is relevant to the 2016 world. The hope is that creating more interesting, culturally relevant projects will help increase engagement and attendance. Also, our students tend to be multiple grade levels behind in their reading skills. There is a general lack of self-confidence when it comes to making making of complex texts. Teachers understand the importance of scaffolding and building efficacy in our scholars. Unfortunately some scholars come in with residual baggage from previous programming and it takes a while for them to trust our efforts to build up efficacy. Scaffolding and questioning strategies have become a priority for the teaching team. These are being worked into our PD calendar. Lastly, teachers are working on ways to set parameters on ”free choice” literature assignments so students are still required to experience a variety of text formats and styles.

Standards-Based Math Instruction CNA

Successes
Increased engagement in intellectual work as a result of more culturally responsive curriculum design.

Prioritized Concerns
Low attendance limits how much access students have to quality projects. Students are much more comfortable with memorizing strategies and formulas than doing higher order thinking with math concepts.

Hypothesized Root Causes (Controllable)
The largest barrier to math instruction at PYC is attendance and gaps in number sense skills. There are similar confidence/efficacy issues as in literacy.

Engagement CNA

Successes
The stress-responsive or trauma-informed work has been a huge success. Teachers and staff are more informed about neurology behind students’ emotional states, and have more tools to respond in helpful and restorative manner. The culture of PYC has also changed as as result of the following changes to our PBIS strategy: Panther Days, ISS/Reflection Day, restorative practices in managing behavior. Students have bought into the culture of PYC and believe that it is a safe, positive place to be.

Prioritized Concerns
Truancy is a major concern for engagement. PYC has great programming and interventions designed to support students, but need students to walk through the door to access these services. Another concern is diagnosed and undiagnosed mental health. We’ve seen an increase in the number of students who struggle with mental health concerns. Lastly, the lack of family support is of high concern. PYC operates as the major family element for many of our students.

Hypothesized Root Causes (Controllable)
untreated/undiagnosed mental health, low/no family support

Graduation CNA

Successes
Dedicated staff to support college and career readiness and to help monitor the progress or graduating seniors.

Prioritized Concerns
SPED seniors with low credits. Truant seniors who are falling behind on credit earning. HHM seniors. Lack of family awareness of college/career readiness benchmarks and process.

Hypothesized Root Causes (Controllable)
Unmet basic needs. Lack of experience in parents.

Literacy Plan

Goal 

Action Plan

Balanced Literacy

Targeted Student Groups:
African American, American Indian

Critical Questioning (6-12)

Targeted Student Groups:
African American, American Indian, Asian/Pacific Islander

Academic Feedback (PK-12)

Targeted Student Groups:
African American, American Indian, Asian/Pacific Islander

Critical Questioning (6-12)

Targeted Student Groups:
African American, American Indian, Asian/Pacific Islander

Academic Feedback (PK-12)

Targeted Student Groups:
African American, American Indian, Asian/Pacific Islander

Critical Questioning (6-12)

Targeted Student Groups:
African American, American Indian, Asian/Pacific Islander

Adult Actions to Implement:
PYC will have required Silent Sustained Reading as part of our advisory program. Students will work with advisers and the Dean of Instruction to select books that are at both their interest and ability level. Advisory teachers will hold students accountable for independent reading by having students keep reading logs where they summarize and respond to prompts about their books.

Adult Evidence to Collect:
Teachers will participate in SSR professional development. Teachers will award credit based off student achievement. Advisers will “teach” SSR and will support students in finding the appropriate reading material

Student Evidence of Success:
Increase in reading scores on standardized tests. Reading stamina will improve. More students will be engaged readers during SSR time.

Professional Development or Support Needed:

“””SSR professional development. New SSR titles that are popular among youth and that are of varying interest/ability levels, SSR logs for students to chart progress and make meaning of texts. ”””

Current Stage:
Exploration

Mathematics Plan

Goal
Action Plan

Adult Actions to Implement:
“The Dean of Instruction will do observations and coaching on the various types of questions asked by teachers and students in classrooms, and the academic discourse that occurs as a result. Teachers will engage in PLCs on critical questioning. Teachers who struggle with questioning will be asked to prepare a modified lesson plan prior to formal observations that focuses on question prep. These lesson plans will be reviewed by the Dean of Instruction prior to observation. The teaching team will also engage in peer observations, where they will be giving their peers feedback on their critical questioning and resulting academic discourse. The Math team will meet to look at achievement data and develop strategies to teach academic vocabulary and pre-planning of effective questioning strategies that will lead to more academic discourse with targeted students and/or classes. The math team share best practices for creating academic discourse.”

Adult Evidence to Collect:
“Evidence will be seen in teacher lesson plans and curriculum maps. Teachers will be observed fostering academic discourse by asking pre-planned questions of varying depths of thought during formal and peer observations. Other evidence includes: formal observation and coaching notes, completed ””critical questions”” lesson plan, PLC notes and action steps, peer observation notes.”

Student Evidence of Success:
“Students will be observed engaged in academic talk during observations and walkthroughs. Students will be able to fluently use academic vocabulary. Increased depth of thinking, more fluent use of academic talk observed in both formal and peer observations. Increase in test scores on MAP and Accuplacer. Increase in credit earning for students with consistent attendance.”

Professional Development or Support Needed:
“””Question planning lesson plan, PLC time to collaborate with colleagues on how to foster academic discourse through questioning strategies and academic vocabulary. ”””

Current Stage:
Exploration

Engagement Plan

Goal
Action Plan

Classroom Engagement*
Targeted Student Groups:
African American, Asian/Pacific Islander, Homeless/Highly Mobile, Special Education

Intentional Relationship Development
Targeted Student Groups:
African American, Asian/Pacific Islander, Homeless/Highly Mobile, Special Education

School-wide Engagement*
Targeted Student Groups:
African American, Asian/Pacific Islander, Homeless/Highly Mobile, Special Education

Restorative Practices
Targeted Student Groups:
African American, Asian/Pacific Islander, Homeless/Highly Mobile, Special Education

Social Emotional Learning
Targeted Student Groups:
African American, Asian/Pacific Islander, Homeless/Highly Mobile, Special Education

Intentional Relationship Development
Targeted Student Groups:
African American, Asian/Pacific Islander, Homeless/Highly Mobile, Special Education

Social Emotional Learning
Targeted Student Groups:
African American, Asian/Pacific Islander, Homeless/Highly Mobile, Special Education

Adult Actions to Implement:
“The SET team will create a system for tracking how many CARE coupons each advisory receives weekly. Students receive CARE coupons when they demonstrate one or more PYC values (Community, Achieve, Respect, Encourage). Advisories will compete to see which group can receive the most CARE points each quarter. SET team will create signs displaying CARE points in each advisory and will update signs weekly.”

Adult Evidence to Collect:
“Teachers’ curriculum maps will include culturally relevant units, collaborative projects with community artists, project based learning, field trips, and service learning opportunities.”

Student Evidence of Success:
“Fewer misbehaviors in classrooms, measured by a decrease in referrals through the SWIS system. More positive behaviors demonstrated in classrooms and hallways measured by an increase in CARE coupons distributed.”

Professional Development or Support Needed:
Online database to track CARE points. Time for SET team to update signs.

Current Stage:
Exploration

Graduation Plan

Goal
Action Plan

My Life Plan
Targeted Student Groups:
Free/Reduced Price Lunch, Homeless/Highly Mobile, Special Education

Expanding Access to Personalized Learning Pathways
Targeted Student Groups:
Free/Reduced Price Lunch, Homeless/Highly Mobile, Special Education

My Life Plan
Targeted Student Groups:
Free/Reduced Price Lunch, Homeless/Highly Mobile, Special Education

Expanding Access to Personalized Learning Pathways
Targeted Student Groups:
Free/Reduced Price Lunch, Homeless/Highly Mobile, Special Education

My Life Plan
Targeted Student Groups:
Free/Reduced Price Lunch, Homeless/Highly Mobile, Special Education

Expanding Access to Personalized Learning Pathways
Targeted Student Groups:
Free/Reduced Price Lunch, Homeless/Highly Mobile, Special Education

Adult Actions to Implement:
The college and career team will work with teachers to integrate MLP tasks into classroom curriculum. The CC team will come into the ELA classes and/or the social studies classes to co-teach lessons that align with the MLP tasks.

Adult Evidence to Collect:
Examples of lesson plans and date of implementation.

Student Evidence of Success:
Students who are present will complete all grade level MLP tasks for their grade level.

Professional Development or Support Needed:
Time for CC team and teachers to connect

Current Stage:
Exploration